Workshops at Charlotte Lit

These are Charlotte Lit’s current workshops, listed in chronological order of when they next begin. To sign up for a course, click the “register” link. Charlotte Lit members receive at least 10% off each course. Memberships begin at just $75/year, and are available here. Questions? Email admin@charlottelit.org.

Registration Open Now

  • Poetry 101: The Craft of Writing a Poem

    With Erin Miller. Two workshops: Apr. 20 and May 18. 7-9 pm. $30 each (member price).

    The best way to learn the craft is to read it, so we’ll devote the first part of the class to reading and discussing sample poems that exhibit a variety of techniques. Afterwards, we’ll dive into the mechanics of poetry—discuss what makes a poem a poem and look at the different genres and shapes a poem can take. We’ll spend the last half of the class writing our own short poems and gathering prompts and sources for developing an ongoing poetry writing practice.

    Monthly workshops follow for those who want to continue exploring the craft. Each class provides an opportunity to discover new poetic forms and deepen the writing practice.

    Erin Miller

    About the Instructor: Erin L. Miller earned her MFA at Bowling Green State University. Her poetry and reviews have appeared in Best New Poets, Whiskey Island, H_NGM_N, Bluestem, Black Warrior Review, and others. She was a finalist for Sonora Review’s 2015 Poetry Prize and the recipient of a Devine Fellowship in 2013. She lives in North Carolina.

    Register: April 20 | May 18

  • Vision & Revision in Poetry & Prose

    With Jessica Jacobs. Saturday, May 13, 10 am – 1 pm. $55 Charlotte Lit members, $65 non-members. Register

    Writers often place a hard line between the acts of writing and revising. While the first is seen as an act of joyful inspiration, the second is generally viewed as drudging perspiration. In this workshop, through a series of innovative exercises and close readings of revision in the works of writers like Stephen King and Sylvia Plath, we’ll explore ways to integrate writing and revising with the goal of infusing both with joy and inspiration, as well as giving you a set of new techniques to take away with you.

    About the Instructor: Jessica Jacobs is the author of Pelvis with Distance (White Pine Press), winner of the 2015 New Mexico Book Award in Poetry, an Over the Rainbow selection by the American Library Association, and a finalist for the Lambda Literary Award and Julie Suk Award, as well as In Whatever Light is Left to Us, a chapbook forthcoming from Sibling Rivalry Press. Jessica holds an M.F.A. from Purdue University, where she was the Editor-in-Chief of Sycamore Review, served as both a Visiting Assistant Professor and Writer-in-Residence at Hendrix College in Conway, Arkansas, and is now on faculty at Writing Workshops in Greece. She lives in Asheville, NC with her wife, the poet Nickole Brown.

  • What a Character! How to Introduce and Develop Your Protagonist, Then Hurl Them into Crisis

    With David Hicks. Monday, June 12, 7-9 pm. $30 Charlotte Lit members, $40 non-members, $20 Authors Lab. Register

    Begin new work or develop your work-in-progress centered on your main character’s behavior before, during, and after the story’s inciting incident. You will finish the workshop with the completed structure of that story and the beginnings of two other original stories.

    About the Instructor: David Hicks is four-time Professor of the Year and Co-Director of the Mile-High MFA program at Regis University in Denver and has edited over twenty beginning writers who then published their work for the first time. He has published many stories in such fine magazines at Glimmer Train, Colorado Review, and Saranac Review, and is the author of WHITE PLAINS, a novel-in-stories published by Conundrum Press, which Leni Zumas calls “a captivating debut” and Ron Carlson calls “a glowing set of stories, like late night messages sent from a friend.” David lives in Colorado, where he enjoys hiking in the mountains with his wife Cynthia and meeting his children for a big breakfast afterwards.

Past and Future Workshops

  • Calling All Songwriters!

    With Nashville singer/songwriter Sally Barris. Saturday, April 22, 10 am – 1 pm. $55 Charlotte Lit members, $65 non-members. Register

    Calling all songwriters! Join me in this fun, creative workshop that will run the entire gamut of songwriting. Ways to find inspiration, crafting a song, connecting the verse to the chorus, how to find a strong hook and challenging yourself to come up with different melodies. Participants are encouraged to bring a song they are working on and plan to receive helpful feedback from a music row professional.  I will also include 12 guitar rhythms every songwriter should know and show how partial capos can serve as alternatives to alternate tunings. Come further yourself on the journey to becoming the best songwriter you can be.

    Sally will also offer private mentoring sessions on Sunday, April 23. Register for one of these sessions here.

    Sally BarrisAbout the Instructor: Sally Barris is an A-list Nashville songwriter who has had songs covered by such top-level artists as Kathy Mattea, Martina McBride, and Lee Ann Womack. Her song “Let The Wind Chase You,” recorded by Trisha Yearwood and Keith Urban, received a Grammy nomination for vocal collaboration in 2009.While her writing credits mightily impress, fans and peers are most captivated by her bright spirit and expressive mountain soprano. Dirty Linen says “Barris knows how to write lyrics that are as forthright as a stream of clear water and how to support them with melodies that share that quality.” Sally also performs with dobro player and guitarist Chas Williams and mandolin player Jason Bailey as “Sally Barris & The Birmingham Boys.” The Minnesota native has performed Mountain Stage, New Bedford Summer Fest, Wildflower Arts & Music Festival and The Kerrville Folk Festival. Sally is currently touring with her new CD “The Road in Me.” Find her on the web at sallybarris.com.

  • The Art of Dialogue

    With Kathryn Schwille. Saturday, April 8, 10 am – 1 pm. $55 Charlotte Lit members, $65 non-members. Register

    In this workshop we’ll talk about how to write effective dialogue, when to use it and what it can do — and not do. How can speech reveal character? How can it do more than that? We’ll look at how a master delivers lines with more than one purpose. In the meantime, eavesdrop on your fellow humans and listen for the unsaid.

    Kathryn SchwilleAbout the instructor: Kathryn Schwille’s short stories have appeared in New Letters, Memorious, Printer’s Row, Crazyhorse, West Branch and other magazines. Her stories have twice won honorable mention in the Pushcart Prize and in 2013 she was awarded an Individual Artist Fellowship from the North Carolina Arts Council. Her novel-in-stories is forthcoming from Hub City Press in 2018. Find links to some of her work at kathrynschwille.com.

  • Master Class: Cinematic Movement

    With Van Jordan. Friday, April 7, 10 am – 1 pm. $65 Charlotte Lit members, $75 non-members. SOLD OUT! Waiting List

    This is a class not only on the craft of writing but also the craft of thinking visually about writing. On a craft level, we will explore film and examine ways in which artistic problems can be solved on a visual level, and, ultimately, translated into the forms and craft of poetry. At the same time, we will examine ways in which the disciplines of poetry and film can inform each other. This is a class for those who want to write better poems, but it’s also a class for those who want to know more about film. We will discuss scenes from the films Psycho and The Untouchables and poems by Lynda Hull, Yusef Komunyakaa, and Robert Hayden.

    About the Instructor: A. Van Jordan is the author of four collections: Rise, which won the PEN/Oakland Josephine Miles Award (Tia Chucha Press, 2001); M-A-C-N-O-L-I-A, (2005), which was listed as one the Best Books of 2005 by The London Times; Quantum Lyrics, (2007); and The Cineaste, (2013), W.W. Norton & Co. Jordan has been awarded a Whiting Writers Award (2004), an Anisfield-Wolf Book Award (2005), and a Pushcart Prize (2007). He is also the recipient of a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship (2007), a United States Artists Fellowship (2009), and the Lannan Literary Award in Poetry (2015).

    Jordan has taught at a number of academic institutions including the University of North Carolina Greensboro, The University of Texas at Austin, and the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor; he currently serves on faculty at Warren Wilson College and as the Henry Rutgers Presidential Professor at Rutgers University-Newark.

  • Exploring Personal Myth through Long-Hand Writing

    With Dennis Slattery. Sunday, March 19, 10 am – 1 pm. $55 Charlotte Lit members, $65 non-members. Register

    We each have within us a personal myth that only we can fully live. Part of life’s challenge is learning not to spend our days living out another’s myth, thinking it is ours, but rather to uncover and engage the myth that belongs to us alone. Personal myths can surface in attitudes, judgments, patterns of thought, and moments of joy. We find them in the ways we deal with strife and glimpse them in the things that attract or repel us. Each of these patterns is a shining mythic key, and writing is one of the most effective ways of using those keys to unlock the mysterious narrative of Self. In this half-day workshop, we’ll use writing as a cursive, spiraling down below the surface of our plotted life to gain access to the influences that shape our daily plot line.

    Author, Poet, Mythologist, and Motorcyclist Dennis Patrick Slattery, Ph.D. has been teaching for 47 years, the last 23 at Pacifica Graduate Institute in Carpinteria, California. He is the author, co-author, editor or co-editor of 25 volumes, including 6 volumes of poetry and on co-authored novel with Charles Asher. He has also published over 200 articles, book reviews and essays in newspapers, magazines, journals and on-line outlets. He has been riding motorcycles for 47 years and enjoys weekend morning rides with his two sons whenever their schedules merge long enough for an outing.

  • The Art & Soul of Reading a Poem

    With Kathie Collins. March 15, 7 -9 pm. Free for Charlotte Lit members, $5 non-members. Register

    A dialogue-based class for readers, writers, and anyone who wants to learn the art of drinking a poem to its dregs. We’ll use multiple approaches, including dialogue, journaling, and meditation, to get to the heart of the poem––and ourselves.

    About the Instructor: Kathie Collins, Ph.D., co-founder of Charlotte Center for Literary Arts, earned her graduate degree in Mythological Studies with an emphasis in Depth Psychology at Pacifica Graduate Institute. A poet and lifelong student of Jungian psychology, Kathie thrives in the in-between space from which dreams and creativity emerge. She’s happiest when she can share that space with others, and one of her great passions is bringing words and people together for transformative conversations. Kathie’s poetry has appeared in Kakalak, BibleWorkbench, and Between. Her chapbook Jubilee was published by Main Street Rag in 2011.

  • Creating Time

    With Paul Reali. March 11, 10 am – 1 pm. $55 Charlotte Lit members, $65 non-members. Register

    What if you could create time? Time is the most precious commodity you have, and the only one you can’t create more of. Or can you? This is a workshop about creating time where there was no time, and then using that new time in a way that matters—to you. Why another workshop on time? Hasn’t it all been said? Truthfully, no. Most books and courses on time management say the same things and offer the same rigid structures. This workshop is different. It’s not about a system that works for them. It’s about decisions that work for you.

    Reali_PaulYou will learn 12 crucial questions that provide you with strategies and tactics for dealing with time. And underneath are creativity’s core skills and stages, applied to make your approach to time an evolving process that will forever change your relationship with time.

    About the Instructor: Trainer, facilitator, and writer Paul Reali is a co-founder of Charlotte Lit. Over the last 25 years, he has taught thousands of students in the art of creative thinking and problem solving. Paul has an MS in Creativity from the International Center for Studies in Creativity at SUNY Buffalo State. Among other works, he is the author of Creativity Rising: Creative Thinking and Creative Problem Solving in the 21st Century,” and the editor of Big Questions in Creativity 2016.

  • Beginning Playwriting

    With Becca Worthington. Four sessions, 6-9 pm. $195 Charlotte Lit members, $225 non-members. TO BE RESCHEDULED, FALL 2017.

    Students will explore the most effective way to tell stories in dramatic form for the stage and will emerge from the four-week course with one ten-minute play. 

    Through the study of the basic elements of drama (action, character, conflict, dialogue) and a variety of examples, students will receive one option of a way in which plays are created, while at the same time focusing in detail on writing their own piece. This is a “learn by doing” class, in that students will learn through their own writing and encouraging other students in the process. Because of the workshop nature of the class, attendance is vital.

    With Becca Worthington. Since receiving her undergraduate degree in Playwriting in 2002, Becca has had twelve of her plays performed in four U.S. states, two countries, and in three languages, received a playwriting scholarship to Sewanee Writer’s Conference in 2006, and was a finalist for the Mark Twain Prize for Comic Playwriting at the KCACTF Festival. She served as Literary Manager and Playwriting Instructor of award-winning off-Broadway theatre company The Barrow Group from 2010-2015 and is currently a Teaching Artist specializing in Playwriting for the Children’s Theatre of Charlotte.

  • Vision Boards for Writers

    With Jodi Helmer. $85 Charlotte Lit members, $95 non-members. Next scheduled: Late Fall 2017

    The concept of a vision board is simple: Cut and paste words and images that represent your goals and dreams. The result is a powerful visual depiction that can serve as a touchstone to help you focus on your goals, improve your productivity and even guide decision making.

    Writers can use vision boards to depict their dreams of bestseller status, envision their ideal writing studio, showcase bookstores/festivals/TV shows for future author appearances or spell out their book titles for inspiration. You can also use a vision board as a storyboard for a novel, creating visual depictions of the setting and characters to turn to for inspiration. In this engaging class, we’ll do exercises to hone in on your vision for your writing life and use that inspiration to create your own vision board. All supplies will be provided.

    Jodi HelmerAbout the Instructor: Journalist. Author. Writing teacher. Doggie momma. Beekeeper. Veggie grower. Vintage needlework collector. Napper. Eater. Canadian. Jodi Helmer has a lot of roles and has managed to build a freelance career by writing about them—and a host of other things that pique her curiosity—for magazines, websites, custom publishers, trade associations, businesses and nonprofits (and teaching other writers to do the same). Her work has appeared in EntrepreneurHemispheresCivil EatsNational Geographic TravelerAARPFarm Life, WebMD, HealthCNNMoney and Guardian Sustainable Business. She is also the author of four books, including The Green Year and Farm Fresh Georgia.

  • Seasoning Your Life with Haiku

    With Martin Settle. Coming Fall 2017.

    An introduction to the art of writing haiku – the short poetic form imported from Japan. We’ll start the morning with a haiku walk, gathering images we’ll use in our writing. Afterwards, we’ll look at the rules for writing American haiku, which are different from traditional Japanese haiku. Then, we’ll write both individual haiku and a group haiku. Discussion topics will include techniques for using association and metaphor, making the essential haiku “leap,” and developing the habit of seeing the world in haiku terms. Best of all, we’ll learn—and experience—the psychological benefits of writing haiku.


    About the Instructor:
    Martin Settle is a poet and assemblage artist, who resides in Charlotte, NC. He has masters degrees in English and Communications and has taught for 32 years, the last 17 at UNC–Charlotte. He is the author of Coming to Attention: developing the habit of haiku (2016) and a poetry collection, The Teleology of Dunes (2015), both published by Main Street RagIn 2016, Mr. Settle won The Poetry of Courage Award (North Carolina Poetry Society), the Nazim Hikmet Award, and the Griffin-Farlow Haiku Award.

  • Scene Study

    With Christine Hale. February 11, 10 am-1 pm. $55 Charlotte Lit members, $65 non-members. Register

    Using examples from published literary works, as well as writing exercises, we’ll examine the individual components of scene making—setting, action, dialogue, and manipulation of time—along with the ways these interact to create tension, subtext, momentum and dramatic impact. We will also discuss the similarities and the differences of scene function in different genres (i.e., fiction, creative nonfiction, and narrative nonfiction).

    About the Instructor: Christine Hale is the author of A Piece of Sky, A Grain of Rice: A Memoir in Four Meditations, and the novel, Basil’s Dream. Her creative nonfiction has appeared in Arts & Letters, Spry, Still, Hippocampus, and Prime Number, among other journals. She earned her MFA from Warren Wilson College and teaches in the Antioch University-Los Angeles Low-Residency MFA Program as well as the Great Smokies Writing Program in Asheville, North Carolina, where she and her husband live.

  • Into the Forest: Prose Poem Mash-Up

    Into the Forest: Prose Poem Mash-Up (or, Mysteries of the Prose Poem Revealed), with Richard Garcia.

    We will discuss the prose poem, where it comes from, where it started, what it is and what it is not; and the difference between prose, prose poem, short, flash…and do we always know? This will be followed by writing exercises based on my last three books of prose poetry, and regular poetry, all published in the last two years. We will be tossing in bits of memory, fairy tales, cartoons, comics, fables, jump-rope rhymes, pop-culture, and big media into a cauldron, stirring, and seeing what emerges.

    About the Instructor: Richard Garcia won the 2016 Press 53 award for his book of prose poems, Porridge, which was published in March of 2016. The Other Odyssey, from Dream Horse Press, won the American Poetry Journal Book Award for 2014; and The Chair, published by BOA, was chosen as the best poetry book of 2015 by the editor of Poetry Magazine. His poems have appeared in many journals and anthologies. He lives in Charleston, S.C. and is on the staff of the Antioch Low Residency MFA in Los Angeles.

  • Constraint or Freedom? Writing in Form

    Constraint or Freedom? Writing in Form, with Morri Creech.

    In this workshop, we will be considering the freedom that form affords us in composing poems. We will focus on blank verse, the sonnet, the villanelle, and the triolet to see how form aids, rather than impedes, creativity and expression.

    About the Instructor: Morri Creech is the author of three collections of poetry, the most recent of which, The Sleep of Reason (Waywiser, 2013), was a finalist for the 2014 Pulitzer Prize. A recipient of NEA and Ruth Lilly Fellowships, as well as grants from the North Carolina and Louisana Arts councils, he is the Writer in Residence at Queens University of Charlotte.

  • The Power of Storytelling

    With Janice Davin. Six Tuesdays, 7:00-8:30 p.m. Returns in 2017.

    Have you ever told a joke? Do you know the story of your birth? Can you describe a trip, an accident, a trick, a surprise? If you can, then you are a storyteller. In fact, we are all storytellers. The human mind is hardwired to perceive and communicate the events of life in story form. Stories create meaning and provide pathways that help us to find our personal and cultural identity. Storytelling is the art of oral composition, an interactive and dynamic experience of co-creation between three equal collaborators: the teller, the listeners, and the story. In this four-week series, learn how to turn favorite stories, personal memories, and story fragments into stories that can be shared orally with others.  Participate in non-threatening games and activities designed to inspire confidence and poise. Enhance your stories through characterization, voice, and gesture. Use active imagination to “listen” to your favorite stories through dialog and visualization. Create new stories or improve a story by asking the story for guidance. Our ordinary lives empower us to be storytellers and our stories teach us how to live.

    About the Instructor: Janice Davin holds an M.Ed., M.A. in Oral Traditions and is a National Board Certified Teacher. She is a professional storyteller who delights audiences of all ages with stories of lasting value. During 35 years in the classroom, Janice told stories to calm savage beasts, subdue mutinies, and make learning memorable. Currently Janice entertains audiences at festivals, churches, organizations, and schools. Through her workshops and retreats, she helps participants discover who they are and who they may become. Janice is the past president of the North Carolina Storytelling Guild and a board member of Charlotte Friends of Jung.  She is a member of the National Storytelling Network, the South Carolina Storytelling Network, and the Society for Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators.

  • Advanced Poetry Workshop: The Poems of Robert Frost

    With Tony Abbott. Six sessions.

    Tony AbbottIn this advanced workshop you will study and analyze the poems of Robert Frost, exploring what you can learn about the craft of poetry from his work. The second half of each class period is dedicated to a formal workshop experience in which class members read and critique one another’s poems. Previous poetry workshopping experience required. Enrollment in this class requires instructor invitation or permission.

    About the Instructor: Anthony S. Abbott is the winner of the NC Award in Literature for 2015. He is the author of seven books of poems, two novels, and four books of literary criticism. He is the Charles A. Dana Professor of English Emeritus at Davidson College, where he has taught since 1964. He and his wife Susan live in Davidson. They have three sons and seven grandchildren.

  • Make a Good Living as a Writer

    With Jodi Helmer. Next scheduled: Spring 2017.

    No one wants to be a starving artist, right? With all of the write-for-exposure gigs out there, is it even possible to earn a good living as a writer? YES! It’s time to stop settling for low wages (or no wages at all) and start bringing in big bucks. In this four-hour workshop, you’ll get the tools you need to build a successful, sustainable freelance business. We’ll cover:

    • The #1 reason you’re not meeting your freelance income goals
    • Strategies for maximizing your research to make more money
    • An undiscovered category of high paying magazines that freelancers aren’t pitching
    • The make-money strategy that ALWAYS fails

    If you’re ready to start running a profitable writing business, join us.

    Jodi HelmerAbout the Instructor: Journalist. Author. Writing teacher. Doggie momma. Beekeeper. Veggie grower. Vintage needlework collector. Napper. Eater. Canadian. Jodi Helmer has a lot of roles and has managed to build a freelance career by writing about them – and a host of other things that pique her curiosity – for magazines, websites, custom publishers, trade associations, businesses and nonprofits (and teaching other writers to do the same). Her work has appeared in EntrepreneurHemispheresCivil EatsNational Geographic TravelerAARPFarm Life, WebMD, HealthCNNMoney and Guardian Sustainable Business. She is also the author of four books, including The Green Year and Farm Fresh Georgia.

  • Launch Your Freelance Career

    With Jodi Helmer. Next scheduled: Spring 2017.

    Before you quit your day job to write, it’s essential to understand the business behind becoming a successful freelancer. In this workshop, we’ll explore the tools for building a successful, sustainable freelance business. The topics covered include developing relationships with editors, establishing expectations for income and workflow, using your research to make more money, and publishing strategies that always fail.

    Jodi HelmerAbout the Instructor: Journalist. Author. Writing teacher. Doggie momma. Beekeeper. Veggie grower. Vintage needlework collector. Napper. Eater. Canadian. Jodi Helmer has a lot of roles and has managed to build a freelance career by writing about them – and a host of other things that pique her curiosity – for magazines, websites, custom publishers, trade associations, businesses and nonprofits (and teaching other writers to do the same). Her work has appeared in EntrepreneurHemispheresCivil EatsNational Geographic TravelerAARPFarm Life, WebMD, HealthCNNMoney and Guardian Sustainable Business. She is also the author of four books, including The Green Year and Farm Fresh Georgia.

  • Vision Boards for Writers

    With Jodi Helmer. Wednesday, TBA, 9:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. Members $75, Non-members $85.

    Vision boards are powerful tools to help you focus on your goals, improve your productivity and even guide decision making. Writers can use vision boards to depict their writing dreams or serve as storyboards for novels. Join us for a vision board workshop. You’ll set your writing goals for 2017 and create a vision board as a reminder of those goals. All supplies will be provided.

    Jodi HelmerAbout the Instructor: Journalist. Author. Writing teacher. Doggie momma. Beekeeper. Veggie grower. Vintage needlework collector. Napper. Eater. Canadian. Jodi Helmer has a lot of roles and has managed to build a freelance career by writing about them – and a host of other things that pique her curiosity – for magazines, websites, custom publishers, trade associations, businesses and nonprofits (and teaching other writers to do the same). Her work has appeared in EntrepreneurHemispheresCivil EatsNational Geographic TravelerAARPFarm Life, WebMD, HealthCNNMoney and Guardian Sustainable Business. She is also the author of four books, including The Green Year and Farm Fresh Georgia.

  • The Long Conversation: A Global Spirit Salon for Writers and Storytellers

    With Phil Cousineau. Thursday, November 10, 7:00-9:00 p.m. Requested donation $15. Register

    “The conversations on Global Spirit are sorely needed in our world today.” –Bill Moyers

    For three decades, author and filmmaker and host of the PBS series, Global Spirit, Phil Cousineau has been offering his popular “Long Conversations” all over the world. Join us this evening for a rousing evening of film clips and discussion. This time he will show 4 clips from his award-winning series (presented by John Cleese), including “Love, Fear and Art” with Carlos and Cindy Santana; “Sacred Travel,” with Pico Iyer and Zoila Mendoza; “Dreams and Visions” with psychologist Stephen Aizenstadt and Aborigine elder Yidumduma Bill Harney; and “The Power of Community,” with Roshi Joan Halifax and Adam Bucko. After each clip we will break into small groups and embark on our own “long conversations.” Special attention will be paid to the topics of interviewing, storytelling, and the emerging forms of new media.

    About the Teacher: Phil Cousineau is a writer, teacher, editor, independent scholar, documentary filmmaker, travel leader, and storyteller. His life-long fascination with the art, literature, and history of culture has taken him on many journeys around the world. He lectures frequently on a wide range of topics–from mythology, film, and writing, to beauty, travel, sports, and creativity. He has more than 30 nonfiction books and 15 scriptwriting credits to his name.

  • The Art of the Sentence

    With Kathryn Schwille.

    The Art of the Sentence: Beautiful sentences will get you nowhere if your story or poem lacks tension, unity of effect or emotional believability. How can a single sentence – its length, rhythm and structure – help move our work toward these necessities? We’ll start with a writing exercise, and move on to study the work of a few masters.

    Kathryn Schwille

    About the instructor: Kathryn Schwille is a fiction and non-fiction writer, freelance editor, and mentor to writers. She has an MFA in creative writing from the Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College, and a BA in English literature from St. Mary’s College, Notre Dame, IN. Kathryn’s short fiction has appeared in Printer’s Row, New Letters, Memorious, Crazyhorse, West Branch, Puerto del Sol, Sycamore Review and other magazines. She has twice been cited for Special Mention in the Pushcart Prize and has received grants from the North Carolina Arts Council and the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Arts and Science Council.

  • Read Like a Writer: Short Stories of Flannery O’Connor

    With Kathryn Schwille.

    Explore fiction by learning how to read fiction like a writer – alert to the craft on the page. We’ll look closely at work from master story-teller Flannery O’Connor – which you’ll read in advance – to see what she does, how she does it and why. We’ll pay particular attention to her decisions about scene, dialogue and the darkly comic.

    Kathryn Schwille

    About the instructor: Kathryn Schwille is a fiction and non-fiction writer, freelance editor, and mentor to writers. She has an MFA in creative writing from the Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College, and a BA in English literature from St. Mary’s College, Notre Dame, IN. Kathryn’s short fiction has appeared in Printer’s Row, New Letters, Memorious, Crazyhorse, West Branch, Puerto del Sol, Sycamore Review and other magazines. She has twice been cited for Special Mention in the Pushcart Prize and has received grants from the North Carolina Arts Council and the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Arts and Science Council.

  • Memoir Writing: Developing Your Story

    With Gilda Morina Syverson. Saturday, October 1, 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. $125. Register.

    Our all-day Memoir Writing workshop is designed for all levels of writers who have a personal or family story they’ve begun to write. The intention of the day is to assist you in improving your work by critiquing your stories in a supportive, workshop environment. Gilda will help you to revise and edit your words for character and point of view, dialogue and voice, and descriptive language. Your papers will be returned to you with helpful feedback that will inspire more writing. If you haven’t started writing yet, consider our Memoir Starter workshop on Sept. 15, in addition to this one. Limited to 10 writers!

    About the Instructor: Gilda Morina Syverson is an artist, poet, writer and teacher. Her Italian-American heritage is the impetus for her memoir My Father’s Daughter, From Rome to Sicily. Gilda’s story was a Finalist for both the Novello Literary Award and the 2015 Ragan Old North State Award for Nonfiction. Gilda’s award winning poems and prose have appeared in literary journals, magazines and anthologies in the United States and Canada. She is also the author of two poetry books, Facing the Dragon and In This Dream Everything Remains Inside. Gilda has taught memoir writing for the last 16 1/2 years, 15 years at Queens University, as well at The Warehouse Performing Arts Center in Cornelius, and other locations. Her fine art has been exhibited regionally, nationally and internationally. Her website is gildasyverson.com.

  • Writing Short Stories: A Summer Workshop for Teens

    extraordinary_franklinWith Miriam Spitzer Franklin. For teens, ages 13+.

    Learn the basics of writing a short story, from prewriting through final draft, from Middle Grade fiction writer Miriam Franklin.

    In this workshop, teen writers will learn the elements of short fiction—characterization, plot, setting, theme, dialogue, voice—through study and analysis of well-written works, then jump into their own story crafting. From inspiration to polished work, students will participate in every part of the writing process: prewriting, drafting, critiquing, revising, and editing. They’ll practice giving and receiving constructive feedback and learn techniques for revising a story until it shines.

    Miriam_FranklinAbout the Instructor: Miriam Spitzer Franklin is a former elementary and middle school teacher who currently does freelance work in the educational field and teaches homeschooled students. Her debut middle grade novel, Extraordinary, was published by Skypony Press in May 2015 and has been picked up by the Scholastic Book Clubs. Her second middle grade novel, Call Me Sunflower, will be published by Skypony Press in Spring 2017. She lives with her husband, two daughters, and two pampered cats in Charlotte, NC. More info: miriamfranklin.com.

    Next scheduled: Summer 2017

  • Pitch-In (Or, Shut Up and Write)

    With Jodi Helmer.

    Remember sit-ins? Groups used to come together in protest, sitting together until their demands were met. The Pitch-In is similar. We’ll protest your lack of pitching and we won’t leave until progress is made.

    The Pitch-In is a hands-on workshop. You’ll come with a laptop and a list of ideas. I’ll pitch in with a combination of group-and one-on-one support to help you develop ideas and research, write and polish queries; I’ll even help you find the right magazines/editors (and email addresses) so you can send your queries on the spot. Expect to write/send least one query during the workshop. You can also bring pitches that haven’t sold for feedback on amping up the “assign me” factor and suggestions for where to send (and sell) them next. Must have freelance experience.

    Jodi HelmerAbout the Instructor: Journalist. Author. Writing teacher. Doggie momma. Beekeeper. Veggie grower. Vintage needlework collector. Napper. Eater. Canadian. Jodi Helmer has a lot of roles and has managed to build a freelance career by writing about them – and a host of other things that pique her curiosity – for magazines, websites, custom publishers, trade associations, businesses and nonprofits (and teaching other writers to do the same).

    Her work has appeared in EntrepreneurHemispheresCivil EatsNational Geographic TravelerAARPFarm Life, WebMD, HealthCNNMoney and Guardian Sustainable Business. She is also the author of four books, including The Green Year and Farm Fresh Georgia.

    Next scheduled: TBA.

  • Creating Time

    With Paul Reali.

    What if you could create time? Time is the most precious commodity you have, and the only one you can’t create more of. Or can you? This is a workshop about creating time where there was no time, and then using that new time in a way that matters—to you. Why another workshop on time? Hasn’t it all been said? Truthfully, no. Most books and courses on time management say the same things and offer the same rigid structures. This workshop is different. It’s not about a system that works for them. It’s about decisions that work for you.

    Reali_PaulYou will learn 12 crucial questions that provide you with strategies and tactics for dealing with time. And underneath are creativity’s core skills and stages, applied to make your approach to time an evolving process that will forever change your relationship with time.

    About the Instructor: Trainer, facilitator, and writer Paul Reali is a co-founder of Charlotte Lit. Over the last 25 years, he has taught thousands of students in the art of creative thinking and problem solving. Paul has an MS in Creativity from the International Center for Studies in Creativity at SUNY Buffalo State. Among other works, he is the author of Creativity Rising: Creative Thinking and Creative Problem Solving in the 21st Century,” and the editor of Big Questions in Creativity 2016.

    Next scheduled: TBA.

  • The Art of the Magazine Essay

    With Jodi Helmer.

    If you’re ready to turn your life experiences into essays that appear in national magazines and newspapers, this is the class for you. You’ll learn the elements of a successful essay, what editors are looking for, how to submit your work and where to find the best markets for publishing essays. The class includes writing exercises and in-class critiques.

    Jodi HelmerAbout the Instructor: Journalist. Author. Writing teacher. Doggie momma. Beekeeper. Veggie grower. Vintage needlework collector. Napper. Eater. Canadian. Jodi Helmer has a lot of roles and has managed to build a freelance career by writing about them – and a host of other things that pique her curiosity – for magazines, websites, custom publishers, trade associations, businesses and nonprofits (and teaching other writers to do the same).

    Her work has appeared in EntrepreneurHemispheresCivil EatsNational Geographic TravelerAARPFarm Life, WebMD, HealthCNNMoney and Guardian Sustainable Business. She is also the author of four books, including The Green Year and Farm Fresh Georgia.

    Next scheduled: TBA.

  • Self-Edit Poetry and Prose Like a Rock Star

    With Alice Osborn and Anne Kaylor.

    Are you frustrated your fiction doesn’t captivate agents? Are your poems unable to find a home in your favorite literary journal or contest—year after year? If you’ve revised and revised, but still no bites, then you need help, and these two editors and authors—with 25+ combined years of experience—know just how to get your mojo moving again. In this workshop, Anne Kaylor and Alice Osborn offer tips and techniques for overcoming “revision fatigue.”For prose, they’ll discuss timelines, character motivation, cliché, dialogue, point of view, setting, and more. For poetry, they’ll share specifics about flabby vs. muscular word choices, concrete versus abstract, line breaks, and conflict within the poem. After this workshop, participants will feel more comfortable with the editing process and with using Word’s Track Changes function. Come prepared with questions and issues from your work-in-progress and Anne and Alice will help you help yourselves. And, as a special bonus, the first five paid registrants receive a short, one-on-one editing session with Anne.

    About the Instructors:

    With experience in public relations and graphic design and degrees in literature and creative writing, Anne Kaylor offers more options to every client, including cover and inside design and comprehensive editing. She turned to creative editing in 2005, after fifteen years in the business world as a technical writer and editor. Her client projects run the gambit—from short story and poetry collections to supernatural novels and spiritual guidance books. As publisher of the prose and photography journal, moonShine review—now in its eleventh year—Anne works with authors on enhancing their submissions, whether accepted or not. When not publishing moonShine or running her own business, she writes. She has two poetry collections, Unwilling to Laugh Alone and Floating a Full Boat, through Main Street Rag Publishing Company, and is currently writing a “flash novel” about one woman growing up during the pivotal ‘60s and ‘70s told through flash fiction snippets. Anne moved to Mount Holly, North Carolina, to gain quiet from the hectic Charlotte scene and be with her now-husband, James. Their two cats continue an uneasy truce, especially around dinner time.

    Alice Osborn’s past educational and work experience is unusually varied, and it now feeds her work as a book editor who helps authors find their authentic voice. Margaret A. Harrell, author of the Keep This Quiet! Series, says, “Alice communicates joy in her work, honestly wanting authors she’s working with to achieve success. Naturally, being a poet, she has a very good sense of language.” Heroes without Capes is her most recent collection of poetry. Previous collections are After the Steaming Stops and Unfinished Projects. Alice is also the editor of the anthologies Tattoos and Creatures of Habitat, both from Main Street RagA North Carolina Writers’ Network board member and Pushcart Prize nominee, her work has appeared in the News and Observer, The Broad River Review, The Pedestal MagazineSoundings Review, and in numerous journals and anthologies. When she’s not editing or writing poetry, Alice is an Irish dancer who plays guitar and violin. She lives in Raleigh, North Carolina, with her husband, two children, four loud birds, and one messy guinea pig. Visit Alice’s website at www.aliceosborn.com.

  • Living in the Layers: The Art and Soul of Reading a Poem

    With Kathie Collins. A good poem can take your breath away. A great poem can wake you up and compel you to change your life. Join Charlotte Lit co-founder Kathie Collins for in-depth exploration and engagement with life-changing poems. In this half-day workshop, you’ll use a number of approaches, including meditation, group discussion, journaling, and collage, to enter the life of a poem––and to find a deeper sense of your own life within it.

    Next scheduled: Summer 2016, date TBA.

    Kathie Collins

    About the instructor: Kathie Collins, Ph.D., co-founder of Charlotte Center for Literary Arts, earned her graduate degree in Mythological Studies with an emphasis in Depth Psychology at Pacifica Graduate Institute. A poet and lifelong student of Jungian psychology, Kathie thrives in the in-between space from which dreams and creativity emerge. She’s happiest when she can share that space with others and one of her great passions is bringing words and people together for transformative conversations. Kathie’s poetry has appeared in Kakalak, BibleWorkbench, and Between. Her chapbook Jubilee was published by Main Street Rag in 2011.

  • Writing Crime Fiction

    With Cathy Pickens. Two sessions, 6:30-8:30 p.m., May 19, and 26. Crime fiction is the most popular fiction genre. You’ve always wanted to write one, but where to start? Where do you get ideas? Do you outline? What about all those sub-genres? How do you structure the plot or develop characters? How do you find time to write? The workshop will explore the types and elements of good crime fiction and the market for crime fiction. Participants will develop a personal writing plan for their stories.

    Cathy PickensNext scheduled: Fall 2016.

    About the Instructor: Cathy Pickens’ first mystery, Southern Fried, won the coveted St. Martin’s Press Malice Domestic Award for Best Traditional Mystery. She’s written five books in that series, articles on writing craft, and a monthly column for Mystery Readers Journal. She served as national president of Sisters in Crime and on the national board for Mystery Writers of America. As a professor in the McColl School of Business at Queens, she won numerous teaching awards and is a founding director and president of the Mecklenburg Forensic Medicine Program.

  • Workshop: Young Adult Fiction: Finding & Crafting Your Story

    With Jenny Hubbard. This workshop covers the essential elements of writing young adult (YA) fiction. The first part of the workshop examines voice and point of view; the second part looks at plot and structure.

    Next scheduled: Fall 2016.

    Jenny Hubbard

    About the Instructor: Jenny Hubbard, a former high-school English teacher, is a major voice in young-adult fiction.  Her second novel, And We Stay, was named a 2015 Printz Honor Book by the American Library Association (ALA), which also honored Jenny’s first book, Paper Covers Rock, with a Morris Award.  Jenny lives with her dog Oliver and husband Steve Cobb in Salisbury, NC.  You can find out more about Jenny and her work at jennyhubbard.com.

  • Writing Outside of the Self: Persona Poetry in the Modern World

    With Erin Miller. The subject of a poem is often presumed to have been plucked directly from the writer’s life (the speaker of a poem is the poet; the speaker of a novel or short story is an imagined character). This hasn’t always been the assumption though. Think of ancient and medieval epic poetry; Dante, Homer, Milton; think of Robert Browning, T.S. Eliot, Anne Sexton. Poets use myth in their work constantly, they borrow and change identities, they shape-shift to whatever form necessary to extract the truth of what they’re trying to say.

    Why is it then that the whole genre of poetry has been lumped into the confessional? In a current era often criticized for its narcissism and short-sightedness, we do find poets writing outside of the self. This isn’t to say that poetry gleaned from everyday life is self-involved. There are any number of reasons why a writer will speak in a voice other than herself: as a means to take a step back from the “selfie culture” as a whole, as a tool to dive into an experience outside of herself, as a method of connecting with the past.

    This class will examine persona poetry and poetry that re-imagines the “I” through various modern and contemporary texts (e.g., James Tate, Diane Gilliam Fisher, Aimee Bender, Chase Twichell, Sherwood Anderson, Alison Stine, Russell Edson, Rebecca Hazelton, Alberto Rios, Hadara Bar-Nadav, Ansel Elkins, Dorothea Lasky). It will also provide a space for discussion on persona poetry and its role in a modern, digital society.

    Next scheduled: Fall 2016.

    Erin Miller

    About the Instructor: Erin L. Miller earned her MFA in poetry at Bowling Green State University. Her poetry and reviews have appeared or are forthcoming in Best New Poets, Whiskey Island, Bluestem, Black Warrior Review, Linebreak, and others. She was a finalist for Sonora Review’s 2015 Poetry Prize and the recipient of a Devine Fellowship in 2013. She has taught college-level composition and creative writing as well as poetry to third, fifth, and seventh graders. She lives in Charlotte.

  • "I Like the Freaks" - Charlotte’s Famous Novel, Carson McCullers’ "The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter”

    Poor Charlotte, infamous for being dull, devoid of history and even worse, unable to brag about contributions to Southern Gothic literature like other cities below the Mason-Dixon can. Luckily for us, two things here are a lie. First: There is no such thing as Southern Gothic, the term is inherently redundant. Second: While living in boarding houses in Charlotte in the late 1930s, a young woman wrote a tale of the weirdest sort of folk, all inter-connected in a stifling mill town.

    In this workshop, we’ll study the book that made Carson McCullers famous, examining the parallels to Charlotte of yesteryear, pre-banktown boom; and the raw depiction of police violence against blacks and income inequality, issues as relevant today as they were 75 years ago.

    Emily HarrisAbout the Instructor: Emily Harris is an award-winning journalist living near Charlotte, N.C. You’ll find her current freelance work in the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Reuters, Huffington Post, WFAE radio, New Republic, Self, Glamour, and several other places. Emily started freelancing in 2010 and is a proud former staff reporter for the Chicago Tribune and the Charlotte Observer. She contributed reporting and writing to projects named a finalist for the Pulitzer prize in 2008 and winner in 2015.

  • Master Class: What We Talk About When We Talk About Voice

    With Sandra Beasley. Voice is the most elusive element of strong writing. How do we craft language that feels compelling and unique? We will unpack constituent elements of voice—the recurring decisions made in terms of point of view, tense, image, sound, structure, and diction—and read examples of effective voice from noted contemporary authors of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. We’ll also put forward some ways that you can intensify your voice on the page, in whatever genre you choose. This seminar includes an extensive handout of texts and a generative prompt.

    Sandra_BeasleyDuring the second half of the workshop, students may circulate a draft brought from home for discussion. Please being pen, paper, and, if you choose, fourteen copies of a draft (prose or poetry) that fits on one page.

    About the Instructor: Sandra Beasley is a 2015 National Endowment for the Arts Award Winning Poet and Author. She won the 2009 Barnard Women Poets Prize for I Was the Jukebox, selected by Joy Harjo (W. W. Norton, 2010). Her first collection, Theories of Falling, won the 2007 New Issues Poetry Prize judged by Marie Howe. Her poetry has appeared in such magazines as PloughsharesTin HouseAGNIVirginia Quarterly ReviewPoetry, and The Believer, as well as The Best American Poetry 2010. In 2013, she won the Center for Book Arts Poetry Chapbook competition, judged by Harryette Mullin. Poems from that chapbook appear in Count the Waves, her third collection, published in 2015 from W. W. Norton.

  • Fiction in a Flash

    With Paula Martinac. Everybody’s talking flash fiction, with online and print journals, anthologies and contests offering numerous paths to publication. Some authors are even writing complete novels-in-flash. In this class, we’ll explore what makes micro narratives of 50, 250, or 1,000 words pop off the page, and how writers can convey character, arc and emotion in a small space. We’ll read a range of examples of flash fiction, experiment with short-shorts through a series of exercises, and discuss venues for our micro masterpieces.

    Paula MartinacPaula Martinac is the author of three published novels, including the Lambda Literary Award-winning Out of Time; a collection of short stories; and three books of nonfictionHer short stories have appeared in Conditions, Blithe House Quarterly, Art & Understanding, Bloom, and other journals; “Comfort Zone” is forthcoming in the Spring 2016 edition of The Raleigh Review. Her fourth novel, The Ada Decades, will be published in Spring 2017 by Bywater Books. She is also a playwright and journalist, and teaches creative writing at UNC Charlotte.

    This workshop returns Fall 2016.

  • First Pages: Solid Beginnings That Hook Readers

    A book’s opening pages must command the reader’s attention. Those first sentences make the sale. In this workshop, we’ll explore techniques for drafting and polishing first pages that engage readers from the first sentence and offer the best gateway to your story. You’ll learn how to conquer the blank page and how to avoid common pitfalls that kill tension and break promises to readers.

    Jane Gari

    About the instructor: Jane Gari has over twenty years of experience leading writing workshops in poetry, fiction, memoir, and publishing. Most recently she’s offered classes through the South Carolina Writer’s Workshop, Workshop of Asheville, and the South Carolina State Library. Jane earned an M.A. in English and American Literature from New York University and has been nominated four times for a Pushcart prize.

    This workshop returns Fall 2016.

  • “So I have this idea for a YA novel...": Exploring the Young Adult Fiction Genre”

    With Jenny Hubbard. In this introduction to writing Young Adult (YA) fiction, we will explore the various subgenres and how to get started on your own novel. Where do you get your ideas? Do you outline or not? How do you know if your story is any good or where it fits in the market? How do you find time to write? How do you develop character and plot? With this quick introduction, you’ll leave with the roadmap for creating your own YA novel.

    Jenny HubbardAbout the Instructor: Jenny Hubbard, a former high-school English teacher, is a major voice in young-adult fiction.  Her second novel, And We Stay, was named a 2015 Printz Honor Book by the American Library Association (ALA), which also honored Jenny’s first book, Paper Covers Rock, with a Morris Award.  Jenny lives with her dog Oliver and husband Steve Cobb in Salisbury, NC.  You can find out more about Jenny and her work at jennyhubbard.com.

    This workshop returns Fall 2016.

  • Songwriting for Everyone

    With Nashville singer/songwriter Sally Barris. In this workshop you will investigate song structure and style. You will learn how writers use their craft to make their work accessible to a listening audience. Participants will write a verse, a chorus and search for “the hook” of the song. You will also explore how internal rhythms can lead to a melody even if you don’t sing or play an instrument. You are encouraged to bring prose, poetry or other samples of your work to see how any form of writing can be adapted into a song. Bring a notebook and your ideas and Sally guarantees you’ll leave with a song.

    Sally BarrisAbout the Instructor: Sally Barris is an A-list Nashville songwriter who has had songs covered by such top-level artists as Kathy Mattea, Martina McBride, and Lee Ann Womack. Her song “Let The Wind Chase You,” recorded by Trisha Yearwood and Keith Urban, received a Grammy nomination for vocal collaboration in 2009. While her writing credits mightily impress, fans and peers are most captivated by her bright spirit and expressive mountain soprano.  Dirty Linen says “Barris knows how to write lyrics that are as forthright as a stream of clear water and how to support them with melodies that share that quality.”

    When Sally is not touring solo, she is known as “Sister Waymore” in the power trio The Waymores with Tom Kimmel and Don Henry. Sally also tours regionally as “Sally Barris & The Birmingham Boys with Chas Williams on dobro and Jason Bailey on mandolin and harmony vocals. In the last 5 years, the Minnesota native has performed Mountain Stage, New Bedford Summer Fest, The Wildflower Festival and The Kerrville Folk Festival. Sally is touring with her new CD “The Road In Me.” Sally’s website is sallybarris.com.

    This workshop returns Spring 2017.

  • Solving the Mystery of Mysteries: An Intro to the Genre

    With Cathy Pickens. In this introduction to writing crime fiction, we will explore the various subgenres (including the use of crime elements in other genres) and how to get started on your own novel. Where do you get your ideas?  Do you outline or not? How do you know if your story is any good or where it fits in the market?  How do you find time to write? How do you develop character, plot, and suspense? With this quick introduction, you’ll leave with the roadmap for creating your own crime novel.

    Cathy PickensAbout the Instructor: Cathy Pickens’ first mystery, Southern Fried, won the coveted St. Martin’s Press Malice Domestic Award for Best Traditional Mystery. She’s written five books in that series, articles on writing craft, and a monthly column for Mystery Readers Journal. She served as national president of Sisters in Crime and on the national board for Mystery Writers of America. As a professor in the McColl School of Business at Queens, she won numerous teaching awards and is a founding director and president of the Mecklenburg Forensic Medicine Program.

    This workshop returns Fall 2016.

  • Write Your Way Around the World: Becoming a Travel Writer

    With Jodi Helmer. Travel writing is a job many people dream about. Now, learn how to make that dream come true! This class will help new writers learn how to develop ideas, approach editors, write articles and travel the world for free. In-class exercises, homework, and thoughtful critiques will help you hone your writing skills and get one step closer to getting published.

    Jodi HelmerAbout the Instructor: Journalist. Author. Writing teacher. Doggie momma. Beekeeper. Veggie grower. Vintage needlework collector. Napper. Eater. Canadian. Jodi Helmer has a lot of roles and has managed to build a freelance career by writing about them – and a host of other things that pique her curiosity – for magazines, websites, custom publishers, trade associations, businesses and nonprofits (and teaching other writers to do the same). Her work has appeared in EntrepreneurHemispheresCivil EatsNational Geographic TravelerAARPFarm Life, WebMD, HealthCNNMoney and Guardian Sustainable Business. She is also the author of four books, including The Green Year and Farm Fresh Georgia.

    This workshop returns Fall 2016.

  • You’ve Written a Book...Now What? Paths to Publication

    With John Hartness. In this workshop, self-published best-seller and small press publisher John G. Hartness will examine all aspects of publishing, from Big 5 New York publishing, to small press, to self-publishing. Students will learn how to submit, how to pursue an agent, how to find an editor, how to price their books, and how to decide what they should do with their masterpiece.

    This workshop returns Fall 2016.

  • Writing Memoir and Personal Essays: Just About Everything You Need to Know

    With Judy Goldman. This workshop is for both established and emerging writers.  Regardless of where you are with your writing, Judy will help you find the “I” in your story, help you convey present knowledge of past experience, help you get your story right.  She will give actual instruction — sharing the nuts and bolts of creative nonfiction that she wishes she had known when she first started.  Bring paper and pen for brief class exercises.

    Judy Goldman

    Judy Goldman’s memoir, Losing My Sister, was a finalist for both Southern Independent Booksellers Alliance’s Memoir of the Year and ForeWord Review’s Memoir of the Year.  Her novels are Early Leaving and The Slow Way Back, finalist for SIBA’s Novel of the Year and winner of the Sir Walter Raleigh Fiction Award and the Mary Ruffin Poole Award for First Fiction.  She’s the author of two books of poetry, the most recent winning the Roanoke-Chowan Prize, Zoe Kincaid Brockman Prize, and the Oscar Arnold Young Prize. Her work has appeared in Real SimpleThe Southern Review, Kenyon Review, Gettysburg Review, Ohio Review, Prairie Schooner, Shenandoah, and others, as well as in many anthologies.  She received the Hobson Award for Distinguished Achievement in Arts and Letters, the Fortner Writer & Community Award (for outstanding generosity to other writers and the larger community), and the Beverly D. Clark Author Award from Queens University.

    This workshop returns Fall 2016.